General Dentistry

At Abigail Rollins, DMD, PC, we take your smile seriously. We listen to your individual needs, and take them and the goals you have for your smile into account.

Click the links below to learn more about what procedures and treatments are commonly used to prevent dental issues and to restore your dental health.

Oral Hygiene
One easy way to improve your mouth health and preserve your teeth longer is to use the right equipment regularly.

We recommend that you add flossing to your dental care routine. If your teeth are tightly spaced, shop around for a floss that will slip more easily between your teeth. If you find it difficult to handle floss, try a floss holder.

Soft-bristled toothbrushes can reach more surfaces, but be sure to get one that is comfortable to hold and works well in your mouth. Don't struggle with one that has bent or frayed bristles that can't be directed accurately. The American Dental Association recommends replacing your toothbrush every three to four months.

For people with limited motor skills or arthritis, a powered toothbrush might be helpful.

If your toothbrush has a rubber tip, use it to massage your gums after brushing. Additional tools include tiny brushes that get in between the teeth, called interproximal toothbrushes, and small interdental picks. Be careful to avoid injuring the gums when using these devices.

Oral irrigators can help remove particles of food around the teeth, especially if you wear braces or fixed partial dentures. But they are not a substitute for brushing and flossing.

Mouthrinses with fluoride can help prevent tooth decay. Using an antiplaque or antigingivitis mouthrinse may be recommended if you have plaque or gum disease.

Check with us if you are not clear on the proper use of any of these products.

Mouthguards
Nighttime Mouthguards
Bruxism (teeth grinding) can cause moderate to severe long-term damage to teeth. Constant grinding wears down the surface of the tooth, exposing the soft dentin beneath the enamel. Some of the damage that can occur includes:
•  Chipped teeth
•  Tooth flattening and tooth wear
•  Cracked tooth enamel
•  Cracked, loose or broken fillings
•  Tooth loss
•  Gum recession
•  Tooth collapse

Bruxing can even cause a root fracture below the gum line, requiring a root canal and crown to restore the damaged tooth.

Athletic Mouthguards
When it comes to protecting your mouth, a mouthguard is an essential piece of athletic gear that should be part of your standard equipment from an early age. While collision and contact sports, such as boxing, are higher-risk sports for the mouth, you can experience a dental injury in non-contact activities too, such as gymnastics and skating.

The three types of mouthguards
Custom-fitted: These are made specifically for you by your dentist. They may be more expensive than the other versions, but because they are customized, usually offer the best fit.

Stock: These are inexpensive and come pre-formed, ready to wear. However, they often don't fit well. They can be bulky and can make breathing and talking difficult.

Boil and bite: These mouth protectors can be bought at many sporting goods stores and drugstores and may offer a better fit than stock mouth protectors. They are first softened in water (boiled), then inserted and allowed to adapt to the shape of your mouth.

The best mouthguard is one that has been custom made for your mouth by your dentist. However, if you can't afford a custom-fitted mouthguard, you should still wear a stock mouthguard or a boil-and-bite mouthguard from the drugstore.

Sealants
Sealants are generally used to help prevent tooth decay on the biting surfaces of back teeth (molars). The natural grooves of these teeth can trap food that can resist casual brushing and rinsing. If left in place, the trapped food allows bacteria to multiply, eventually causing tooth decay and requiring costly attention.

Sealants are painted directly onto the tooth where they seal the natural grooves to help prevent tooth decay. While sealants are durable, they are not permanent. They can last up to 5 years of normal wear before needing replacement.

Sealants offer a cost-effective, preventative step to reduce the chances of tooth decay on the chewing surfaces of molars. However, they do not replace the need for regular brushing and flossing.

Bridges
A dental bridge is a fixed (non-removable) appliance and is one of the traditional dental methods for replacing missing teeth.

The type of bridge used most often is called a fixed bridge, and consists of two crowns that go over two anchoring teeth (abutment teeth) and are attached on either side of the artificial teeth (pontics), filling the gap created by one or more missing teeth.

Dental bridges are highly durable and will last many years with proper home care; however, they may need to be replaced or re-cemented due to normal wear.

Reasons for a Fixed Bridge
•  Fill the space of missing teeth
•  Maintain facial shape
•  Prevent remaining teeth from drifting out of position
•  Restore chewing and speaking ability
•  Restore your smile
•  Upgrade from a removable partial denture to a permanent dental appliance

What Does a Fixed Bridge Involve?
Getting a bridge usually requires two or more visits. While the teeth are numb, the two anchoring teeth are prepared by removing a portion of enamel to allow for a crown. Next, a highly accurate impression (mold) is made which will be sent to a dental laboratory where the bridge will be fabricated. In addition, a temporary bridge will be made and worn for about two weeks until your next appointment.

At the second visit, your bridge will be carefully checked, adjusted, and cemented to achieve a proper fit and comfortable bite.

You will receive care instructions at the conclusion of your treatment. Proper brushing, flossing, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new bridge.

Crowns
A crown (or cap) is a covering that encases the entire tooth surface restoring it to its original shape and size. A crown protects and strengthens the tooth structure, giving the tooth a longer life than it would have if restored by fillings or other types of restorations.

There are three common types of crowns: all-porcelain (tooth colored), porcelain fused to metal, and gold.

All Porcelain
A very aesthetically pleasing crown usually recommended for front teeth only. There is a higher risk of this type of crown fracturing if placed on posterior teeth.

Porcelain Fused to Metal
A metal based crown with porcelain baked to the outside to make it more aesthetically appealing. This type of crown is great for someone who wants a tooth colored crown but still wants durability. There is still a risk of fracturing these types of crowns but usually it is just the outside porcelain that chips off.

Gold
This type of crown is very durable! They are recommended for back teeth where the crown cannot be seen, and they are often recommended for people who grind or clinch their teeth. Gold crowns are most like your natural teeth and your tissue adapts best to this material. Also, less actual tooth structure needs to be removed for this type of crown.

If a crown is needed, Dr. Abigail Rollins will discuss what type of crown would be best for you.

Reasons for Crowns
•  Broken or fractured teeth
•  Cosmetic enhancement
•  Decayed teeth
•  Fractured fillings
•  Large fillings
•  Tooth has had a root canal

What Does Getting a Crown Involve?
A crown procedure usually requires two appointments. During your first appointment, the dentist will prepare the tooth by removing any decay and shaping the surface to properly fit the crown. Then he or she will take impressions that will be sent to the lab to create your custom crown. You will wear a temporary crown for approximately two weeks while your custom crown is being fabricated.

At your second appointment your temporary crown will be removed, the tooth will be cleaned, and your new crown will be carefully placed to ensure the spacing and bite are accurate.

You will be given care instructions and encouraged to have regular dental visits to check your crown. As always, proper oral hygiene will help extend the life of your new crown.

Dentures
Dentures are a "replacement" option for missing teeth. There are two variations of dentures: partial dentures and full dentures. The difference between the two lies in how many natural teeth remain.

When the condition of the teeth has deteriorated so far that they can no longer be repaired, removal is the only option.

A complete denture is a removable prosthesis of white plastic teeth in a pink gum-colored plastic base; the denture rests on the remaining gum ridge once all of the teeth in the arch have been removed.

It is important to note that life with an upper and/or lower denture is a major lifestyle change when compared to natural teeth. Dentures impact the type of food you are able to eat, your self-confidence in social situations and even your self-esteem.

Reasons for a Full Denture
•  All teeth missing in the same arch
•  Restore chewing ability
•  Restore a natural looking smile
•  Economical alternative to other procedures

An upper full denture will almost always feel better than a lower full denture. In order to dramatically improve the fit of a lower full denture, we frequently suggest using dental implants as a retentive mechanism. Implants placed in the lower jaw can help anchor the denture and significantly improve comfort. Sometimes, the implants can even be placed in the jaw after a denture has been in use for several years.

Inlays and Onlays
Inlays and onlays are used to restore portions of the tooth, or to strengthen a tooth. They are alternatives to using fillings or a crown to restore the integrity of the tooth.

Inlays
When there is only partial damage to your tooth, an inlay can be bonded inside the remaining tooth structure. Traditionally, gold is the material of choice for this type of restoration, and although this is available, most of our dental patients prefer the more natural look that ceramic provides.

Onlays
Onlays are used to restore a portion of the biting cusp of a tooth or to restore the strength of a tooth. Instead of removing healthy tooth structure for a crown placement, an onlay can be used as a more conservative restoration.

Sometimes onlays are referred to as "inside crowns." That is a good description, as it describes the strengthening process that an onlay creates for the tooth. At Abigail Rollins, DMD, PC, we prefer to do onlays when possible to lessen the amount of healthy tooth removed, compared to traditional crowns. Research has shown that the less you reduce a tooth, the better it will survive long-term, and our goal is to provide you with healthy teeth for life.





Abigail Rollins, DMD, PC
1524 Commercial St S.E.
Salem, OR 97302

p: 971-915-0555
f: 503-378-0853


Business Hours:
Monday-Thursday
8:00 AM-4:30 PM








Abigail Rollins, DMD | www.abigailrollinsdmd.com | (971) 915-0555
1524 Commercial St. SE, Salem, OR 97302



 

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Abigail Rollins, DMD, 1524 Commercial St. SE, Salem, OR, 97302-4310 - Related Phrases: dentist Salem OR, Dr. Abigail Rollins Salem OR, dentist Salem OR, (971) 915-0555, www.abigailrollinsdmd.com, 7/17/2017